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June 18, 2014

Apple Unveils Cheaper 21.5-Inch iMac

New iMac

If you've been eyeing an iMac but holding off because of the price, Apple may have just the thing for you.

The Cupertino tech giant on Wednesday added a new budget-friendly option to its 21.5-inch iMac lineup. The entry-level machine starts at $1,099 and sports a 1.4GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 processor with Turbo Boost Speeds up to 2.7 GHz. That's $200 cheaper than the 2.7GHZ model and $400 less than the 2.9GHz version.

Other features of the new iMac include Intel HD 5000 graphics, 8GB of memory, and a 500GB hard drive. All iMac models include next-gen 802.11ac Wi-Fi, two Thunderbolt ports, and four USB 3.0 ports. Configure-to-order options include a 1TB hard drive, a 1TB Fusion Drive, and up to 256GB flash storage.

The new iMac is available today through Apple's online store, the company's retail stores, and select Apple authorized resellers. All new Macs also come with iLife and iWork software for free.

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September 24, 2013

Apple Refreshes iMac With Haswell, Next-Gen Wi-Fi

New iMacs

Apple today announced a refresh to its iMac lineup, which adds Intel's new Haswell processors, next-gen Wi-Fi, and more.

The new 21.5- and 27-inch desktops get fourth-generation Intel quad-core processors, new graphics, 802.11ac Wi-Fi, and faster PCIe flash storage options.

"iMac continues to be the example that proves how beautiful, fast and fun a desktop computer can be," Philip Schiller, Apple's senior vice president of Worldwide Marketing, said in a statement. "Inside its ultra-thin aluminum enclosure, the new iMac has the latest Intel processors, faster graphics, next generation 802.11ac Wi-Fi and faster PCIe flash storage."

The updated iMac supports 802.11ac Wi-Fi, which - when connected to an 802.11ac base station, provides up to three times faster wireless performance, Apple said.

PCIe-based flash storage, meanwhile, makes Fusion Drive and all-flash storage options up to 50 percent faster, Cupertino said. Fusion Drive is a combination of Flash Storage and a regular hard drive, which promises shorter boot times and faster access to apps and files. Apple provides the option of an iMac with a 1TB or 3TB Fusion Drive, and all-flash storage options are now available in configurations up to 1TB. For more, check out 5 Things to Know About the Apple Fusion Drive.



March 16, 2013

THX Sues Apple, Claims iPhone, iMac, iPad Speakers Infringe Patent

Apple iPhone 5 (AT&T)

THX has filed suit against Apple, claiming that the tech giant has infringed on one of THX's patent's for "Narrow profile speaker configurations and systems" within the company's iPhones, iPads, and iMacs.

The result? The violations cause THX "monetary damage and irreparable harm," reports Bloomberg, and the company is seeking monetary damages or royalty payments, as well as a court order that would force Apple to cease its alleged infringement.

According to THX's complaint, filed Thursday in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California, Apple's infringing the patent on its iPhone 4 (and later models), iPads, and iMacs, "which incorporate narrow-profile speaker units that output sound through a duct or aperture having a narrow dimension."

Here's where it gets interesting. The patent that THX is holding over Apple's head was granted to the company in 2008. U.S. Patent No. 7,433,483 describes, in part, "A narrow profile speaker unit comprises at least one speaker outputting sound towards an internal surface and through a duct with an output terminus, such as a slot, having a narrow dimension, effectively changing the cross-section of the speaker's audio output wave. A pair of speakers may face one another, outputting sound towards a common output slot."



March 6, 2013

Apple Launches New $1,099 Education-Only iMac

iMac

With little fanfare, Apple this week launched a new version of its low-end iMac for educational institutions.

The machine sports the same iconic iMac design, but with scaled-down specs and a more affordable price tag compared to consumer iMacs. It has the same 21.5-inch display, but on the inside there's a cheaper 3.3-GHz dual-core Intel i3 processor instead of a 2.7-GHz quad-core Intel Core i5. The machine also has 4GB of RAM instead of 8GB and a 500GB hard drive, instead of 1 terabyte.

The newly redesigned iMac starts at $1,099, which is $100 more expensive than its predecessor. Even so, it'll save educational institutions $200 over the entry-level consumer iMac.

iMac education

The new addition to Apple's lineup was first spotted by MacRumors. The previous $999 iMac for educational institutions was introduced more than a year ago, aimed at budget-constrained schools. Like its predecessor, the new machine can only be purchased by learning institutions, and is not available to individuals through Apple's educational discount program.

As of now, the new educational iMac is listed with an estimated ship date of five to seven business days.  



March 4, 2013

Apple iMac Shipping Times Drop to One to Three Days

iMac

Those who order a new Apple iMac can now expect its arrival within just one to three business days.

Estimated shipment times for the 21.5-inch and 27-inch models improved on Saturday from weeks to just one to three business days. Just last week, Apple's website listed the 21.5-inch model with an estimated ship date of two to three weeks, while the pricier, 27-inch model was said to take up to a month to ship.

Supplies of the two models have been limited since they launche late last year. Back in January, Apple CEO Tim Cook acknowledged that there were "significant constraints" that prevented Cupertino from getting its new desktops to everyone who wanted them. Overall, iMac sales were down 700,000 year over year in 2012.

"We believe our Mac sales would have been much higher absent those constraints," Cook said at the time.

Apple unveiled its new iMac lineup at its October iPad mini event, pricing the computers at $1,299 and $1,499 for the 21.5-inch or $1,799 and $1,999 for the 27-inch.



January 24, 2013

Mac Sales Dip Amidst iMac Constraints, iPad Cannibalization

iMac

Mac sales dipped slightly in the fourth quarter, and while Apple CEO Tim Cook attributed part of the drop to iPad cannibalization, supply constraints with the iMac also played a big role, he said.

Apple sold 4.1 million Macs during the quarter, which was down from the 5.2 million it sold during the same time period in 2011.

In a Wednesday conference call with analysts, Cook said the decline is due to three main factors: iMac constraints, the fact that the 2012 fourth quarter was shorter than 4Q 2011, and channel inventory.

Overall, iMac sales were down 700,000 year over year. Apple's revamped iMacs were released in late 2012, but there were "significant constraints" that prevented Cupertino from getting its new desktops to everyone who wanted them. "We believe our Mac sales would have been much higher absent those constraints," Cook said.

Meanwhile, 4Q 2012 was 13 weeks long whereas there were 14 weeks during 4Q 2011. "Last year, in the average week, we sold 370,000 Macs," Cook said.

Finally, channel inventory was down by about 100,000 units without the iMac. "So, if you just take these three factors, they bridge more than the difference ... between this year's sales and last year's sales," Cook concluded.



December 7, 2012

27-Inch Apple iMac Shipments Slip to January

iMac

Consumers won't be handing out 27-inch Apple iMacs as holiday gifts this year. Cupertino's online store tips a January shipment date for orders placed now.

Apple.com says "Available to ship: January" underneath the 27-inch version of the new iMac, while the 21.5-inch version will ship within 7-10 business days.

Apple started selling the 21.5-inch iMac on Nov. 30. At the time, it also started taking pre-orders for the 27-inch iMac, but said it would not be available until December. Now it appears iMac enthusiasts will have to wait a few more weeks.

According to Ars Technica, those who placed their 27-inch iMac orders early were told it would ship in 2-3 weeks. A few Ars staffers who placed their orders have an expected ship date between Dec. 21-28.

Apple unveiled its new iMac lineup at its October iPad mini event, pricing the computers at $1,299 and $1,499 for the 21.5-inch or $1,799 and $1,999 for the 27-inch.

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November 27, 2012

Apple to Start Shipping New iMacs Nov. 30

iMac

Apple today confirmed that its new iMac lineup will be available starting Nov. 30.

The 21.5-inch iMac will be on sale starting Friday via Apple.com, Apple Stores, and Apple re-sellers. The 27-inch version will also be available for pre-order that day, but won't ship until next month.

At this point, the iMac site on Apple.com still says "Coming soon."

Earlier this month, a French website reported that manufacturing problems would delay the launch of Apple's new iMacs until next year. 9to5Mac, however, said the devices were still on track to ship by year's end.

Apple unveiled the new iMacs at its October iPad mini event. The 21.5-inch iMac starts at $1,299, while the 27-inch will run you $1,799.



November 19, 2012

Are Apple’s New iMacs Delayed or Not?

iMac

Will iMac fans get their revamped devices by the end of the year? Though a recent report suggested that the new iMacs had been delayed, 9to5Mac claims they are still on track for release this year.

French website MacBidouille reported recently that manufacturing problems will delay the release of the computers, which would be "very bad news for Apple," according to a translated version of the site's story.

According to 9to5Mac, however, the 21.5-inch and 27-inch iMac devices are still on track to ship before the end of the year.

Cupertino is already shipping new 21.5-inch iMacs to distribution centers across the U.S. and in several other countries, according to 9to5Mac, which said the iMacs are expected to be available for ordering from Apple's online store by the end of November, when the new models are also likely to hit brick-and-mortar stores.

During its October iPad mini event, Apple also announced a refresh to its Mac lineup. The 21.5-inch iMac starts at $1,299 and will ship in November, while the 27-inch will run you $1,799 and ships in December, Apple said at the time. 9toMac said its sources indicated that Apple is still on track for those release dates.

Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment.



July 3, 2012

Rumor: Retina Display iMac Coming in October

iMac Apple's Retina display first landed on the iPhone, followed by the iPad and the new MacBook Pro. Next up, however, could be Apple's iMac, according to a new report.

DigiTimes, citing "upstream supply chain sources," reported that a revamped version of Cupertino's popular all-in-one desktop will enter production this month in preparation for an official launch "possibly around October." The Taiwanese newspaper, which has a spotty record with tech rumors, said Apple is looking to expand its Retina display across all product lines, meaning the new iMac "will have a high chance" of getting one.

The new rumor, however, conflicts with a report from The New York Times last month that cited an Apple executive who said that redesigned Mac desktop models are on tap, but likely won't arrive until next year. Apple didn't mention anything about the iMac or MacPro at its Worldwide Developers Conference keynote in June - opting to instead quietly roll out a small update without any fanfare - causing some to speculate that Cupertino's desktops were headed for the grave. Tim Cook, however, later reportedly penned an email in which he assured a worried customer that there was still some life in the Mac Pro.

DigiTimes, meanwhile, said Apple is aiming to put a Retina display in all its products to beat out competitors on screen resolution. Retina displays are a very expensive component, so most other PC vendors probably won't launch a product with the higher-resolution panel anytime soon, the newspaper pointed out.

While Apple could very likely give its iMac a Retina display, the latest rumor should be taken with a grain of salt. Time columnist Harry McCracken recently fact-checked 25 of Digitimes' tech stories. "By my count, 16 of these 25 stories turned out to be mostly or completely off-base. Five are largely or entirely correct. And four involve predictions that might yet come true," McCracken said.

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